Women politicians study the effects of indoor air pollution on the health and economy in Bosnia and Herzegovina

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Women politicians study the effects of indoor air pollution on the health and economy in Bosnia and Herzegovina
Within WFD’s “More than a quota” mentorship programme, a group of women politicians from different political parties works on getting the issue on the agenda through advocacy and legislative work.

During the winter, air pollution in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) reaches unprecedented levels, with country’s capital Sarajevo often being the most polluted capital in the world. Indoor air pollution is particularly dangerous for citizens of BiH, although it is an issue that remains relatively unknown as outdoor air pollution takes over when the entire country chokes in thick layers of smog. Within WFD’s “More than a quota” mentorship programme, a group of women politicians from different political parties works on getting the issue on the agenda through advocacy and legislative work.

As part of the activities implemented within this programme, a study that maps the health, legal, and economic implications of extremely hazardous indoor air in the country was published. The pandemic outbreak forced people to spend more time in their homes, making the issue of indoor air pollution more acute and requiring immediate and devoted action by decision-makers. Topics covered in this research relate to parameters, the main elements that pollute the air quality and the effects it has on human health. The study provides an analysis of the economic implications caused by indoor air pollution, conclusions and recommendations for further action on this subject.